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New FSM Feature: Raiders 2024 Draft Picks

Franchise Sports Media

The Raiders surprised everyone with their first pick: Georgia tight end Brock Browers, one of the premier players in the draft. Take a look at how the Raiders draft played out.

 

Raiders 2024 Draf | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: Kirby Lee/USA TODAY Sports

The 2024 NFL draft took place in Detroit, and it was time for Tom Telesco and Antonio Pierce to make the Raiders into their image. RaiderNation wants to know the new direction of the franchise and to build off a successful second half of the 2023 season. 

There were a few questions that needed to be answered. Will the Raiders draft their new franchise quarterback, and would they have to trade up to do so? Or will they wait and look to build from the inside out on the offensive line? 

Would they go with a shutdown corner to help the defense, or would they add to the defensive line and continue to build a bully defense to wreak havoc in the AFC West? 

In part, Raiders owner Mark Davis hired and trusts Telesco to build a championship-caliber team through the draft, something he had much success doing during his time as the Chargers GM. Davis wants long-term, sustained success and trusts Telesco to give Pierce the players to do so. 

To start day one of the NFL draft, the Raiders had the 13th pick in the first round. 

 

Raider 2024 Draft Picks

 

Raiders 2024 Draft | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: USA TODAY Sports

Round 1 (#13):

 Brock Bowers – TE – Georgia 

Georgia TE Brock Bowers has been regarded as one of the best 2024 NFL Draft prospects since he first hit the field as a true freshman in 2021. Right away, he showed he was different — and his final scouting report only confirms what he’s made apparent.

Bowers grades out as a top-10 prospect in the 2024 NFL Draft. He’s a blue-chip talent and the clear-cut No. 1 player at his position. His ability arguably transcends positional bounds and will enable him to be a usage-versatile offensive weapon in the NFL.

Some prospects make evaluations easy, and Bowers does that. From the very start of his collegiate career, he proved to be a cut above the average player. His constant production emphasizes that, and his tape only confirms his rare ability.

Bowers is around average size for a traditional tight end, but that’s one of the only knocks on his profile. He’s a true size/speed freak within his mold with the long-strider range to chew up space vertically and destroy tackling angles in space.

Beyond his sheer speed and explosiveness — both of which are hyper-elite positional traits — Bowers also has superb cutting ability, foot speed, and flexibility — tools he weaponizes as a route runner and release artist, as well as a RAC dynamo off motions and screens.

Bowers can still work on refining his plant-and-drive technique on specific routes, and his versatility stops at being a consistent in-line blocker without high-end size and strength. But overall, there’s little stopping him from being an instant Day 1 asset for an offense and a potential game-changing force.

With Bowers, don’t get hung up on the positional designation. He’s not just a tight end. He’s a weapon — and his ability to separate, be utilized in dozens of ways, and tear apart defensive looks within the three-level framework will make him a valid offensive focal point. – Ian Cummings – PFN

 

 

Raiders 2024 Draft | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: University of Oregon Athletics

Round 2 (#44):

Jackson Powers-Johnson – OL – Oregon

Powers-Johnson grades out as a Top-50 prospect in the 2024 NFL Draft on my board. He’s the best “pure center” prospect on my rankings, slightly edging out players like Frazier and Van Pran.

For teams in need of a long-term starter at center, Powers-Johnson is worthy of early Day 2 capital — at the very least. He could ultimately sneak into Round 1 because of his talent, physicality, and positional scarcity.

The 21-year-old already looks and feels like a high-level NFL starter at the fulcrum. His composite profile helped him win the Rimington Trophy in 2023, and that same profile should help him become an impact NFL starter early in his career.

At 6’3″, 320 pounds, Powers-Johnson is an explosive and nimble athlete in both the lateral and vertical modes. What’s even more impressive is his power load at that size.

Powers-Johnson doesn’t have elite length, but he’s still able to channel massive amounts of power and torque on his extensions, punches, and drive blocks.

The 21-year-old already looks and feels like a high-level NFL starter at the fulcrum. His composite profile helped him win the Rimington Trophy in 2023, and that same profile should help him become an impact NFL starter early in his career.

At 6’3″, 320 pounds, Powers-Johnson is an explosive and nimble athlete in both the lateral and vertical modes. What’s even more impressive is his power load at that size.

Powers-Johnson doesn’t have elite length, but he’s still able to channel massive amounts of power and torque on his extensions, punches, and drive blocks. – Ian Cummings – PFN

 

 

Raiders 2024 Draft | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: Kevin Langley/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images

Round 3 (#77):

Delmar Glaze – OT – Maryland

Glaze grades out as a fringe top-100 prospect in the 2024 NFL Draft. At the earliest, he could be worth mid-to-late Day 2 consideration, but he’d be an even better value pick early on Day 3.

He has actionable experience at left and right tackle and profiles as an immediate swing tackle with starting upside.

At around 6’4″, 323 pounds, with massive 34 1/2″ arms, Glaze checks a lot of the physical boxes. And beyond his measurements, he’s a great athlete whose lateral mobility, in particular, is a major plus. He also brings quality short-area correction and enough explosiveness to close ground and attack in the ground game.

Glaze’s best qualities come in pass protection. With his experience, he’s become a natural at keeping his pass set clean, as well as maintaining leverage, balance, and pad level. And while keeping synergy with his feet, he’s shown he can latch, re-extend, combat opposing moves, and jar rushers at contact.

Having said all this, Glaze still has room to improve in both phases. There are still several minute technical deficiencies in pass protection that impede his ability to absorb power moves and restrict outside paths for speed rushers — and his reaction speed can be a tick slow in recovery at times.

Meanwhile, as a run blocker, Glaze can be much more consistent at loading his base and extracting his full power output to displace defenders. He’s also not entirely angle-sound in space and doesn’t always channel the proper flexibility and strength to execute reach blocks.

Glaze’s uncertain utility as a run blocker clouds his early projection, and he likely functions best as a swing tackle in the immediate timeline. Nevertheless, Glaze has the high pass-blocking floor to be a quality spot starter, and in time, he could grow to become a quality starter on either the left or right side. – Ian Cummings – PFN

 

 

Raiders 2024 Draft | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: Kevin Snyder/MSU Athletics

Round 4 (#112):

DeCamerion Richardson – CB – Mississippi State

Richardson grades out as a top-100 prospect in the 2024 NFL Draft. He has a heightened degree of projected versatility, and for either man-heavy or zone-heavy schemes, he’s worth consideration in the mid-to-late Day 2 range.

It’s not brash to say that Richardson might have one of the highest ceilings in the 2024 NFL Draft CB class. He has truly effortless explosiveness and closes ground in a blink with his accelerative capacity and long-strider athleticism.

Going further, for his size — 6’2″, 188 pounds, with arms well over 32″ long — Richardson has extremely impressive short-area twitch, agility, malleability, and recovery athleticism, with enough sink to channel his speed through direction changes and supplement transitions.

On film, Richardson’s complete physical pallet yields a complete technical toolbox as well. He can match and jam WRs in press-man, using feet first. He can pedal and plant in off-man and uses shuffle-steps and side-saddle to maintain hip leverage in zone.

To top it all off, Richardson plays with a play pace that matches his blistering speed. He exudes relentless energy coming downhill in run support, and he’s quick to react to route modulations and breaks in off-man and zone coverage.

Having said all this, the 23-year-old still has room to improve. His technique can feature slight inefficiencies at times, and he’s susceptible to double moves and blind-spot manipulation. Richardson also struggles to track and play the ball down the field, which can allow big plays to go through unobstructed for opposing offenses.

In the immediate timeline, Richardson has enough matching awareness, technical versatility, range in recovery, and support utility to be a rotational boundary corner in the NFL, and he could take starting reps sooner rather than later. At his ceiling — if he can reach that point — Richardson has impact starter potential. – Ian Cummings – PFN

 

 

Raiders 2024 Draft | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: Adam Cairns/Columbus Dispatch/USA TODAY NETWORK

Round 5 (#148):

Tommy Eichenberg – LB – Ohio State

Tommy Eichenberg lives and thrives as a strong-run defender. His run-game intelligence combined with an outstanding motor is impressive to watch. Eichenberg reads blocking concepts well to find potential lanes for the ball carrier and clogs them. He is disciplined with quarterback zone-read responsibilities and containment.

Eichenberg’s play recognition is a strength of his game. He identifies run versus pass at a quick rate. He embodies the phrase, “slow until you know.” He attacks the line of scrimmage with decisiveness and urgency. One of the best downhill linebackers in the class. Eichenberg shoots gaps well to knife into the backfield to make a play on the football. Within the right scheme, he can be a consistent force in the backfield working through the offensive line.

Against the pass, Eichenberg is a reliable and well-timed blitz defender. He does not rush or speed up his process to pressure the QB. He plays the tempo game to fool blockers into letting down their guard and vacating a lane. Eichenberg is a spot dropper in zone coverage. He keeps his head on a swivel to identify any routes entering his designated zone. He gains good depth even out of simulated pressure looks.

Eichenberg is an average sideline-to-sideline athlete. He lacks the speed to cover ground from the inside linebacker position. He is not an ideal candidate to deploy in man-to-man coverage against tight ends or running backs out of the backfield. There are some hip tightness concerns along with athleticism that make man coverage a difficult ask. Eichenberg is not a great change-of-direction mover. Versus the run, he can be a tad over-aggressive when working downhill and will bite on play-action. Fighting through and shedding blocks is a bit of a challenge for him.

Eichenberg projects as a strong-side outside linebacker. Eichenberg will have an impact on early downs versus the run, with responsibilities as a blitzer on passing downs. He is a good, instinctive linebacker but athletic concerns can limit him to a two-down role. – Damian ParsonThe Draft Network

 

 

Raiders 2024 Draft | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: YouTube

Round 6 (#208):

Dylan Laube – RB – New Hampshire

Laube enters the NFL with an excellent third-down pass-catching specialist package and showcases some exciting traits of an effective complementary runner in the league.

We’ve seen players with Laube’s skill set and size start with a specific role to begin their careers, but they play so well that it makes it tough to get them off the field, such as James White and Austin Ekeler.

However, questions regarding his prospect profile do exist. His lack of pure power and tendency to bounce runs out to the perimeter could be an issue entering the league.

Yet, Laube is certainly an intriguing Day 3 prospect who could sneak into the end of Day 2 if a team needs a dynamic pass-catching threat out of the backfield who also returns kicks and punts. – Ian Cummings – PFN

 

 

Raiders 2024 Draft | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: Air Force Academy Athletics

Round 7 (#223):

Trey Taylor – Safety – Air Force

Taylor is a productive down safety with good size and the type of character teams will want in the locker room. He’s much more effective as a short-zone defender or in split safety alignment from a coverage standpoint.

Taylor appears to lack the athletic profile and speed necessary to handle man coverage as a pro. He’s an urgent run defender who works around blockers to make plays near the line, but he’ll also overrun his leverage and end up attempting too many arm tackles.

Taylor has enough working in his favor to have a shot at making a roster. – Lance ZierleinNFL.com

 

 

Raiders 2024 Draft | Franchise Sports Media
Photo Credit: University of Pittsburgh Athletics

Round 7 (#229):

M.J. Devonshire – CB – Pittsburgh

Devonshire grades out as a mid-Day 3 prospect in the 2024 NFL Draft and is worthy of consideration in that range for teams needing developmental upside at cornerback. Particularly for teams in need of off-man, zone, and slot-boundary versatility, he could field consideration early on Day 3.

The physical tools are extremely appealing with Devonshire. At around 5’11”, 186 pounds, he has uniquely long arms (almost 33″), and his 4.45 40-yard dash and 38.5″ vertical are representative of his speed and explosiveness — both on the vertical plane and on click-and-close reps.

Going further, Devonshire is a smart, well-versed cover man with great route-recognition ability and spatial management skills in zone coverage. He also has the pedal ability and hip leverage maintenance skills to play in off-man.

In press-man, Devonshire shows upside as well. His unique frame allows him to play low while also getting his hands inside his opponent’s frame. Yet, his desire to impose physicality can yield over-aggression and a lack of discipline, which can cause cascading technical issues.

At almost 24 years old, Devonshire still has work to do with his press-man and off-man technique, plus he lacks high-end hip fluidity. His relatively high-cut frame can impact his transition freedom and recovery in tight quarters. Expanding on his frame, Devonshire’s lighter build affects his play strength, tackling, and utility in support.

With support limitations and questions in man coverage, Devonshire’s path to consistent starting reps is unclear. But if he improves his technique and fills out his frame a bit more, there’s an outcome where he maintains a role on defense.

Devonshire has the speed, explosion, length, processing ability, urgency, and slot-boundary versatility to be a solid rotational presence and spot-starter in zone and off-man heavy schemes. On top of it all, Devonshire is an instinctive turnover generator with gravity as a playmaker — a trait that could elevate his ceiling down the line. – Ian Cummings – PFN

 

Keep coming back to FSM throughout the weekend for all your Raiders Draft coverage. Thanks for visiting FranchiseSportsMedia.com for your Las Vegas Sports news today.

 

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-Joe Arrigo   Franchise Sports Media

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